Posts Tagged ‘Arhoolie Records’

Down Home Music In Store Funky Jazz plus Red Beans by Chef Marc

May 14, 2017

#WATCHMOVIE HERE: Down Home Music In Store Funky Jazz plus Red Beans by Chef Marc

Jon’s archive https://archive.org/details/DOWNHOMEINSTOREPERFORMANCEJONHAMMONDMARCBAUMFunkyJazzBluesFreeRedBeansRice

Youtube https://youtu.be/jb8R1kHnz4U

Vimeo https://vimeo.com/217339146

Jon Hammond and Marc Baum go back a long long time! – Jon Hammond at the Hammond organ Marc Baum on tenor saxophone, Down Home Music Store – possibly a funky drummer as well folks (David Luce came and played) – http://www.downhomemusic.com/down-home-in-store-performance-jon-hammond-marc-baum-funky-jazz-blues-free-red-beans-rice-friday-may-12th-at-5pm/# c’mon down! Bring a spoon! (we’ll have plastic ones don’t worry), Chef Marc is cooking it up personally! — “Thanks to all the folks who came out to our Down Home Music Store In-Store yesterday in downtown El Cerrito CA

– Home of Chris Strachwitz’ Arhoolie Records!:
“Artists who have recorded for the Arhoolie label include: Big Mama Thornton, Big Walter Horton, Dave Alexander, Nathan Beauregard, Juke Boy Bonner, Clifton Chenier, Elizabeth Cotten, Sue Draheim, Jesse Fuller, Earl Hooker, John Jackson, Mance Lipscomb, Guitar Slim, Robert Shaw, Mississippi Fred McDowell, Whistlin’ Alex Moore, George ‘Bongo Joe’ Coleman, Charlie Musselwhite, Doctor Ross, Bukka White, Big Joe Williams, Silas Hogan, Mercy Dee Walton, Black Ace, The Campbell Brothers, BeauSoleil, Jerry Hahn, the Savoy Family Band, the Pine Leaf Boys, Los Cenzontles, The Klezmorim, Rose Maddox, Rebirth Brass Band, and HowellDevine.” special thanks City Hall Records of San Rafael CA – Jon Hammond *Note: Jon Hammond’s equipment: Hammond Sk1 organ powered by Markbass Bass Amplifier #DownHomeMusic #ElCerrito #HammondOrgan #LateRent #MarkBassAmp

Producer Jon Hammond
Language English

EVENT https://www.facebook.com/events/211461899357488/

DOWN HOME RECORDS IN-STORE PERFORMANCE: JON HAMMOND and MARC BAUM Funky Jazz & Blues + Free Red Beans & Rice – FRIDAY MAY 12th at 5PM – El Cerrito CA
Jon Hammond and Marc Baum go back a long long time! – Jon Hammond at the Hammond organ Marc Baum on tenor saxophone 10341 San Pablo Ave. Down Home Music Store – possibly a funky drummer tba as well folks – c’mon down! Jon Hammond
Downtown El Cerrito CA http://www.downhomemusic.com/
EVENT at Down Home Music Store on San Pablo Avenue in downton El Cerrito CA – bring a spoon! we’ll have plastic ones don’t worry, Chef Marc is cooking it up personally!

Thanks to all the folks who came out to our Down Home Music Store In-Store yesterday in downtown El Cerrito CA!
Danny Scher / DanSun Productions in the house!

Jon Hammond – 10341 San Pablo Ave. Address: 10341 El Cerrito, CA 94530

1999 article:

http://www.sfgate.com/entertainment/article/BGP-s-Scher-Out-on-His-Own-2939361.php

BGP’s Scher Out on His Own
Edited by James Sullivan, Chuy Varela Published 4:00 am, Sunday, March 28, 1999

When Bill Graham’s longtime personal assistant Rita Gentry left the late promoter’s company for Carlos Santana’s office, the company threw a going-away party. At the gathering, Vice President Danny Scher noted the gradual erosion of Bill Graham Presents personnel since its late-1997 sale to corporate consolidator SFX Entertainment, which is buying up promoters and concert venues around the country.
The people leaving BGP, Scher said, “are what I would call the DNA of the company.”
Now one more piece of the puzzle has left: Scher. Twenty-four years after Graham plucked the young promoter from Stanford — where his successful student concerts with Dave Mason, Loggins & Messina and Joan Baez were cutting into Graham’s dominance of the Bay Area concert scene — Scher has decided to strike out on his own.
Two weeks ago he threw open the doors on Dansun Productions, the small concert-promotion company he will run with his own longtime BGP associate, Lori Sun-Look. They’ll book mostly jazz acts, some in conjunction with BGP. Forthcoming shows with Los Van Van and the Afro-Cuban All-Stars will set the business in motion
It’s Scher’s true love. “I don’t necessarily want to get back into the big rock ‘n’ roll machine,” he says.
As a shareholder in Bill Graham Presents, Scher, 47, was enriched by the sale to SFX. “At this stage of my life I don’t have to do things just for the money,” he says.
As proof, he offers a labor of love scheduled for early May: He’s arranging a recording session for 90- year-old Narvin Kimball, the last surviving member of New Orleans’ original Preservation Hall Jazz Band.
“I once told Narvin, ‘If you make it to 90, give me a call.’ A few months ago the phone rang. He said, ‘This 90-year-old man has a good memory.’ ”
Over the years, Scher spearheaded some of the Graham empire’s biggest projects. One, in fact, was called the Biggest Party in History — a multifestival blowout across Texas featuring the Who, Stevie Ray Vaughan, Natalie Cole and dozens of other acts.
He also developed the Shoreline Amphitheatre — perennially one of the top-grossing venues in the country — and founded the annual New Orleans by the Bay festival.
Conversely, he suffered through some other projects, including the Seattle-area amphitheater that was to open last year but sits unused and half-completed.
Despite SFX’s initial statements to the contrary, Scher says, its presence is evident in the Bill Graham offices. “They’re definitely injecting their corporate mentality and influence into the company.
“This had to happen. Can you think of any merger where that hasn’t happened?”
The sale, he says, made his decision to leave an easy one. “I had a great run at BGP. I’m thankful I had the opportunity to work with Bill and the people there, and I have a lot to show for it. “I just felt it was time to get my groove back.”
— James Sullivan

Jon Hammond Trio at Down Home Music In Store Funky Jazz plus Red Beans by Chef Marc



Published May 13, 2017
Usage Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0

Down Home Music, In-Store, Arhoolie Records, Jon Hammond, Marc Baum, Funky Jazz, Blues, Hammond Organ, Saxophone, El Cerrito, City Hall Records, #ElCerrito #HammondOrgan #DownHome #Arhoolie

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I just came from 1st Line & 2nd Line parade right down San Pablo Avenue in El Cerrito CA

September 19, 2014

I just came from 1st Line & 2nd Line parade right down San Pablo Avenue in El Cerrito CA – honoring Chris Strachwitz of Arhoolie Records
for his documentary film released this evening indi production called “This Ain’t No Mouse Music” –
tonight’s the night!
Jon Hammond

By Jim Harrington <a href="honoring Chris Strachwitz of Arhoolie Records
for his documentary film released this evening indi production called "This Ain't No Mouse Music" –
tonight's the night!
Jon Hammond
By Jim Harrington http://www.mercurynews.com/entertainment/ci_26552568/review-this-aint-no-mouse-music-fascinating-story
Chris Strachwitz has spent the past 54 years unearthing musical treasures, journeying into the shadows of America to record all sorts of artists who might otherwise never be documented.
His travels have fueled Arhoolie Records, the El Cerrito-based roots-music label that has issued 400-plus albums and more than 6,500 songs since its founding in 1960. Now, Strachwitz's long, strange trip is nicely chronicled in "This Ain't No Mouse Music!"
The documentary illustrates the dramatic impact Strachwitz's efforts have had on the music world — and on "world music." Notably, it shows how the Arhoolie recordings greatly helped popularize Cajun, Tex-Mex, bluegrass and other regional music styles while bringing some much-needed attention to such significant musicians as Tejano accordionist Flaco Jimenez, zydeco titan Clifton Chenier, bluegrass great Del McCoury and Texas bluesman Mance Lipscomb.
Given that impressive list, it shouldn't be a surprise that the soundtrack is one of the best things about "This Ain't No Mouse Music!" It's a remarkably diverse collection of styles and artists that — like the Arhoolie catalog itself — is simply sewn together with the common thread of Strachwitz's personal taste in music.
"I didn't want to record stuff that I didn't like," he explains in the movie, providing a de facto mission statement for his label.
Yet, Strachwitz seems at a loss when he tries to describe exactly what it is that attracts him to a song or artist.
"I don't know why I like it so much," he says about some unnamed piece of music in the film. "It's just got some guts to it. It ain't wimpy, that's for sure. It ain't no mouse music."
Advertisement

The film never really defines "mouse music," but we're given the impression that it's music of the overly produced, highly commercial variety. And, yes, it's a safe bet that you won't hear "mouse music" on an Arhoolie record.
The film begins — much like Strachwitz's career in music — with the blues. Strachwitz is shown walking through the Arhoolie offices, housed in the back of his low-key record shop Down Home Music on San Pablo Avenue in El Cerrito, with an album in hand. He takes it over to the turntable and drops the needle — unleashing Lightnin' Hopkins' "Big Mama Jump" — and then smiles like a kid in a candy store.
He's not just mugging for the camera. That's Strachwitz in a nutshell — a man who still dearly loves listening to music after more than a half-century in the business. And that's a mighty rare situation in the music industry.
"This Ain't No Mouse Music" works, in large part, because of Strachwitz's unbridled — and some would say unrivaled — enthusiasm for Americana music. He comes across on film exactly like he does in person: passionate, opinionated, motivated and incredibly down to earth. I interviewed Strachwitz in 2011, on the occasion of Arhoolie's 50th anniversary celebration, and the quotes from that chat read like slices of dialogue from this documentary.
He's a natural storyteller, blessed with many great yarns as well as a magnetic presence in front of the camera. Directors-producers Chris Simon and Maureen Gosling wisely keep the focus on him, fleshing out the briskly paced film with short interviews from other members of Arhoolie's extended family and representative music clips.
The film devotes the bare minimum to Strachwitz' boyhood in Germany and the family's flight in the 1940s to America, where he fell in love with the cornucopia of sounds coming out of his radio — hillbilly country, Mexican music, gospel, blues, etc. The film really takes flight after he moves to the Bay Area to attend UC Berkeley and embarks on series of musical treasure hunts to record artists deserving of wider exposure. The first Arhoolie release was the blues record "Mance Lipscomb: Texas Sharecropper and Songster" in 1960.
Watching people work in a recording studio can be as interesting as watching paint dry. Fortunately, Strachwitz favors "field recordings" — where an artist is taped in his or her local environs, no matter how rustic — which makes for some fascinating footage.
"My stuff isn't produced. I just catch it as it is," he says in the film. "I never had a studio — I never wanted a studio. Because I knew that the music I liked was all over the place."
Follow Jim Harrington at Twitter.com/jimthecritic and Facebook.com/jim.bayareanews.
‘This Ain’t No Mouse Music!’
Documentary about music historian Chris Strachwitz, founder of Arhoolie Records in El Cerrito
* * *
Rating: not ratedDirectors: Chris Simon and Maureen Gosling
Running Time: 1 hour, 32 minutes
Also: Elmwood Theatre in Berkeley will host a Q&A with Chris Strachwitz and musical performance following the 7 p.m. screening on Friday (www.rialtocinemas.com); the Roxie Theatre in San Francisco will host a Q&A with filmmakers Chris Simon and Maureen Gosling and live music after 7 p.m. screenings Friday and Saturday.”>http://www.mercurynews.com/entertainment/ci_26552568/review-this-aint-no-mouse-music-fascinating-story
Chris Strachwitz has spent the past 54 years unearthing musical treasures, journeying into the shadows of America to record all sorts of artists who might otherwise never be documented.
His travels have fueled Arhoolie Records, the El Cerrito-based roots-music label that has issued 400-plus albums and more than 6,500 songs since its founding in 1960. Now, Strachwitz’s long, strange trip is nicely chronicled in “This Ain’t No Mouse Music!”
The documentary illustrates the dramatic impact Strachwitz’s efforts have had on the music world — and on “world music.” Notably, it shows how the Arhoolie recordings greatly helped popularize Cajun, Tex-Mex, bluegrass and other regional music styles while bringing some much-needed attention to such significant musicians as Tejano accordionist Flaco Jimenez, zydeco titan Clifton Chenier, bluegrass great Del McCoury and Texas bluesman Mance Lipscomb.
Given that impressive list, it shouldn’t be a surprise that the soundtrack is one of the best things about “This Ain’t No Mouse Music!” It’s a remarkably diverse collection of styles and artists that — like the Arhoolie catalog itself — is simply sewn together with the common thread of Strachwitz’s personal taste in music.
“I didn’t want to record stuff that I didn’t like,” he explains in the movie, providing a de facto mission statement for his label.
Yet, Strachwitz seems at a loss when he tries to describe exactly what it is that attracts him to a song or artist.
“I don’t know why I like it so much,” he says about some unnamed piece of music in the film. “It’s just got some guts to it. It ain’t wimpy, that’s for sure. It ain’t no mouse music.”

The film never really defines “mouse music,” but we’re given the impression that it’s music of the overly produced, highly commercial variety. And, yes, it’s a safe bet that you won’t hear “mouse music” on an Arhoolie record.
The film begins — much like Strachwitz’s career in music — with the blues. Strachwitz is shown walking through the Arhoolie offices, housed in the back of his low-key record shop Down Home Music on San Pablo Avenue in El Cerrito, with an album in hand. He takes it over to the turntable and drops the needle — unleashing Lightnin’ Hopkins’ “Big Mama Jump” — and then smiles like a kid in a candy store.
He’s not just mugging for the camera. That’s Strachwitz in a nutshell — a man who still dearly loves listening to music after more than a half-century in the business. And that’s a mighty rare situation in the music industry.
“This Ain’t No Mouse Music” works, in large part, because of Strachwitz’s unbridled — and some would say unrivaled — enthusiasm for Americana music. He comes across on film exactly like he does in person: passionate, opinionated, motivated and incredibly down to earth. I interviewed Strachwitz in 2011, on the occasion of Arhoolie’s 50th anniversary celebration, and the quotes from that chat read like slices of dialogue from this documentary.
He’s a natural storyteller, blessed with many great yarns as well as a magnetic presence in front of the camera. Directors-producers Chris Simon and Maureen Gosling wisely keep the focus on him, fleshing out the briskly paced film with short interviews from other members of Arhoolie’s extended family and representative music clips.
The film devotes the bare minimum to Strachwitz’ boyhood in Germany and the family’s flight in the 1940s to America, where he fell in love with the cornucopia of sounds coming out of his radio — hillbilly country, Mexican music, gospel, blues, etc. The film really takes flight after he moves to the Bay Area to attend UC Berkeley and embarks on series of musical treasure hunts to record artists deserving of wider exposure. The first Arhoolie release was the blues record “Mance Lipscomb: Texas Sharecropper and Songster” in 1960.
Watching people work in a recording studio can be as interesting as watching paint dry. Fortunately, Strachwitz favors “field recordings” — where an artist is taped in his or her local environs, no matter how rustic — which makes for some fascinating footage.
“My stuff isn’t produced. I just catch it as it is,” he says in the film. “I never had a studio — I never wanted a studio. Because I knew that the music I liked was all over the place.”
Follow Jim Harrington at Twitter.com/jimthecritic and Facebook.com/jim.bayareanews.
‘This Ain’t No Mouse Music!’
Documentary about music historian Chris Strachwitz, founder of Arhoolie Records in El Cerrito
* * *
Rating: not ratedDirectors: Chris Simon and Maureen Gosling
Running Time: 1 hour, 32 minutes
Also: Elmwood Theatre in Berkeley will host a Q&A with Chris Strachwitz and musical performance following the 7 p.m. screening on Friday (www.rialtocinemas.com); the Roxie Theatre in San Francisco will host a Q&A with filmmakers Chris Simon and Maureen Gosling and live music after 7 p.m. screenings Friday and Saturday.

*LISTEN TO THE AUDIO HERE: HammondCast 15

Jon’s archive https://archive.org/details/HammondCast_15

HammondCast 15 for KYOU Radio, this show just before Jon blasts over to Hamburg Germany to record a new album at NDR Radio. Special guest recordings of Jon with radio legend Al Jazzbeaux Collins telling the story of Jon’s composition “Train Song” and with Chuy Varela talking about the meaning of Jon’s song “Get Back In The Groove” played 2 different ways: from “Hammond’s Bolero” CD 2003 release (instrumental) and a 1981 version from DTI Records label with Frank Biner on vocals and Jon covering all the instruments + Dave Danza on the drums. Last song: “Czechoslovakian Salsa Song”-JON HAMMOND Trio.
HammondCast is the music of Organist/Accordionist Jon Hammond *Member American Federation of Musicians Union Local 802/Local 6/ASCAP Publishing-JON HAMMOND International, Inc. “The FINGERS…are the SINGERS!”
http://www.HammondCast.com
Music, Travel & “Soft-News”

Reviewer: Bobby Kimball – 5.00 out of 5 stars5.00 out of 5 stars5.00 out of 5 stars5.00 out of 5 stars5.00 out of 5 stars – August 29, 2012
Subject: Jon Hammond is pure genius….
I love Jon’s music, and he’s also one of the nicest, most talented guys I’ve ever met. God Bless you Jon. Keep that “Best Music” coming….Bobby

Youtubes of every song we played in Auster Bar Hamburg going backwards Jon Hammond Band

http://youtu.be/BqtFWKBeC0c “Cooking at The Auster Bar”

http://youtu.be/9P8yZiXgWfI “Tribute to Cannonball – Mercy Mercy Mercy”

http://youtu.be/MdQi8mAslzE “Tribute to Bobby Timmons – Moanin’ / Blues”

http://youtu.be/jtAaQLH_BYk “Late Rent – Them Song”

http://youtu.be/orpLWd66-Hw “No X-Cess Baggage Blues”

http://youtu.be/LFhxrDs6PbQ “Lydia’s Tune – Bossa Nova”

http://youtu.be/MxpIJesOJXQ “Pocket Funk”

http://youtu.be/q4_lNnwzxrU “Auster Blues and Jazz

Jon’s archive http://ia802300.us.archive.org/27/items/CookingAtTheAusterBarJonHammondBandWithNDRHorns/Cooking%20at%20The%20Auster%20Bar%20Jon%20Hammond%20Band%20With%20NDR%20Horns.mp4

Jon’s archive https://archive.org/details/AwesomeFunkyJazzTributeToCannonballNDRHornsJonHammondBand

Full High Definition Version:
Awesome Funky Jazz Tribute to Cannonball NDR Horns feature on Jon Hammond Band Auster Bar Jazz Series concert Hamburg Eimsbüttel.

Welcome Knut Benzner – NDR Redaktion!

NDR Horns on Jon Hammond Band: L to R Michael Leuschner t., Lutz Büchner t.s., Fiete Felsch a.s.

Funky Heinz Lichius drums, Michael Leuschner trumpet, Lutz Büchner tenor, Friedrich Fiete Felsch alto, Joe Berger guitar, Jon Hammond organ + bass

Chris Strachwitz, Arhoolie Records, Down Home Music Store, El Cerrito CA, San Pablo Ave., Jon Hammond, Blues, Jazz, Cajun, Zydeco, Clifton Chenier, Organ, Accordion