Pocket Funk 2012 Jazzkeller Frankfurt and Jon’s Journal September 29, 2012

*WATCH THE VIDEO HERE: Pocket Funk 2012 Jazzkeller Frankfurt Musikmesse Warm Up Party Jon Hammond Band

Youtube http://youtu.be/Nn6BjZoJyEk

Jon Hammond’s annual Musikmesse Warm Up Party in Jazzkeller Frankfurt featuring Tony Lakatos tenor saxophone, Giovanni Gulino drums, Joe Berger guitar, special guest:
Lee Oskar harmonica and Jon Hammond at the Hammond Sk1 organ powered by TecAmp 2 x 12 Neodymium rig special thanks to Thomas Eich TecAmp.
This evening marks 26 years continuous Musikmesse for Jon and also on his 59th birthday, special thanks to the Saray Pastanesi Baeckerei & Konditorei bakery for baking the beautiful Chocolate on Chocolate cake which you will see in this film, thanks Martina for wonderful presentation, Eugen Hahn, Marc and all Jazzkeller Frankfurt Team, Messe Frankfurt, P.Mauriat Music Saxophones Alex Hsieh team, Suzuki Hammond, Tombo Lee Oskar team, camera by Jennifer http://www.HammondCast.com see you next year!
Pocket Funk as heard on The Jon Hammond Show TV program on MNNTV and on Late Rent album – Behind The Beat http://behindthebeat.com/2004/12/jon-hammond-late-rent/ by Steve Rosenfeld “Jon Hammond says “the fingers are the singers.'” The latest CD from this exceptional and soulful Hammond organist is the proof. “Late Rent” draws on decades of great recording sessions and top live performances to showcase his own playing and many top jazz and funk artists. It shows why the Hammond organ is one of the most enduring electric instruments and why Hammond is one of its best players.”

StageDive Feature:
http://www.stagedive.com/jonhammondband/videos/777/Francoise-Pujol-and-Band-special-performance-presented-by-Cobi-Narita-on-911-at-ZEBs-NYC
honor of anniversary of 9/11, pianist Francoise Pujol direct from Paris France wi
th her Band at ZEB’s New York City performing her original composition “Not Yet” *note, from Francoise – in French the title is really: “Pas Encore” ( = “Not Yet” ) ( not yet …blond !, not yet … dead ! ) with (also from Paris) Marc Loy vocals, Florent Richard Fender bass, Alain Gouillard drums – camera: Jon Hammond and announcement at end before his playing. This was a special program produced by great lady of Jazz, Cobi Narita and Saul Zebulon Rubin with many top jazz performers. Frank Owens was the master of ceremonies and also played wonderful piano with his trio backing many of the vocalists and saxophonists Frank Staton (97 years old) and BIlly Harper who also performed on this special evening. “Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2012 – REMEMBERING SEPT. 11 – NEVER AGAIN! AND CELEBRATING JAZZ IN NEW YORK” Enjoy! Jon Hammond

Joe Morello His NAMM Oral History was completed on June 8, 2007
http://www.namm.org/library/oral-history/joe-morello
Joe Morello’s influential drumming style was showcased on the landmark Dave Brubeck recording of “Take Five.” Ever since, he has inspired generations of performers. Joe became an icon in the music product’s industry through his long associations with manufacturers as an endorsee, music retailers as a clinician, and publishers as an author of successful method books. He gave advice and lessons to all who ask, and was often known to be the last to leave a clinic – ensuring all questions have been
answered.

Joe Morello the legendary Jazz Drummer July 17, 1928 – March 12, 2011
Instead of hearing aids, he had a lady who would repeat everything in to his ear – Jon Hammond
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joe_Morello

Joseph Albert Morello (July 17, 1928 – March 12, 2011) was a jazz drummer best known for his 12½-year stint with The Dave Brubeck Quartet. He was frequently noted for playing in the unusual time signatures employed by that group in such pieces as “Take Five” and “Blue Rondo à la Turk”. Popular for its work on college campuses during the 1950s, Brubeck’s group reached new heights with Morello. In June 1959, Morello participated in a recording session with the quartet — completed by the alto saxophonist Paul Desmond and the bassist Eugene Wright — that yielded “Kathy’s Waltz” and “Three to Get Ready,” both of which intermingled 3/4 and 4/4 time signatures
Morello suffered from partial vision from birth,[3] and devoted himself to indoor activities. At six years old he began studying the violin, going on to feature three years later as soloist with the Boston Symphony Orchestra, playing Mendelssohn’s Violin Concerto, and again three years later.
At the age of 15 Morello met the violinist Jascha Heifetz and decided that he would never be able to equal Heifetz’s “sound”, so switched to drumming, first studying with a show drummer named Joe Sefcik and then George Lawrence Stone, author of the noted drum textbook Stick Control for the Snare Drummer. Stone was so impressed with Morello’s ideas that he incorporated them into his next book, Accents & Rebounds, which is dedicated to Morello. Later, Morello studied with Radio City Music Hall percussionist Billy Gladstone.
After moving to New York City, Morello worked with numerous notable jazz musicians including Johnny Smith, Tal Farlow, Stan Kenton, Phil Woods, Sal Salvador, Marian McPartland, Jay McShann, Art Pepper, Howard McGhee, and others. After a period playing in McPartland’s trio, Morello declined invitations to join both Benny Goodman and Tommy Dorsey’s bands, favoring a temporary two-month tour with the Dave Brubeck Quartet in 1955; Morello remained with Brubeck for well over a decade, only departing in 1968. Morello later became an in-demand clinician, teacher and bandleader whose former students include Danny Gottlieb, Max Weinberg, Rich Galichon, Phish drummer Jon Fishman, Gary Feldman, Patrick Wante, Frankie Valli and the Four Seasons drummer Gerry Polci, Jerry Granelli, and Glenn Johnson.
External videos
Oral History, Joe Morello explains how he became a member of The Dave Brubeck Quartet. interview date June 8, 2007, NAMM (National Association of Music Merchants) Oral History Library
Morello appeared in many Brubeck performances and contributed to over 60 albums with Brubeck. On “Take Five”, he plays an imaginative drum solo maintaining the 5/4 time signature throughout. Another example of soloing in odd time signatures can be heard on “Unsquare Dance”, in which he solos using only sticks without drums in 7/4 time. At the end of the track, he can be heard laughing about the “trick” ending. He also features on “Blue Rondo à la Turk”, “Strange Meadow Lark”, and “Pick-Up Sticks”.
During his career, Morello appeared on over 120 albums, 60 of which were with the Dave Brubeck Quartet. He authored several drum books, including Master Studies, published by Modern Drummer Publications, and also made instructional videos. Morello was the recipient of many awards, including Playboy magazine’s best drummer award for seven years in a row, and Down Beat magazine’s best drummer award five years in a row. He was elected to the Modern Drummer magazine Hall of Fame in 1988, the Percussive Arts Society Hall of Fame in 1993, and was the recipient of Hudson Music’s first TIP (Teacher Integration Program) Lifetime Achievement award in June, 2010.[4]
Joe Morello died on March 12, 2011, at his home in Irvington, New Jersey. He was 82 years old. His death was announced on his website, although no cause of death was given — with Joe Morello

Frankfurt Germany — Jon Hammond with Volker Buchele in the Fernandes TecAmp stand at Frankfurt Musikmesse — at musikmesse

Frankfurt Germany — Jon Hammond and Ralph Voggenreiter of Voggenreiter Verlag – I’ve been to 26 consecutive Musikmesse’s but I bet Ralph has me beat! – JH — at musikmesse

Go for the Sound! – and don’t forget your Hat – Jon Hammond and Alex Mingmann Hsieh PMauriat Saxophones — with Alex Mingmann Hsieh

New York NY — Time for Gyros Plate dinner with good friend Andy Christo #1 good music fan on MacDougal Street in Greenwich Village – L to R: Joe Berger, Andy Christo, Jon Hammond Ali Baba Restaurant 126 MacDougal St
New York — with Joe Berger

New York NY — King of Radio & TV Joe Franklin with Jon Hammond in Joe’s famous office “Memory Lane”
Youtube http://youtu.be/NEWGszvpduU
Joe Franklin “King Of Nostalgia” Host of Radio & TV who’s guests have been entertainers like Bill Cosby to legends like Bing Crosby, Charlie Chaplin,
John Wayne, Marilyn Monroe, Cary Grant, John Lennon, here with Jon Hammond.. — with Joe Franklin

Jon Hammond and Joe Berger aka Ham-Berger
Joe is playing through the Leslie G37 100W 1×12 Guitar Combo Amp, Jon has the hammer down through the 300 watt Leslie model 3300 Youtube http://youtu.be/H-wZJpToWbE — with Joe Berger at Namm

Jazz Organist Jimmy Smith was absolutely hilarious here, exactly one month before he kicked the bucket unfortunately
Youtube http://youtu.be/HYHNxdXCny4
Jimmy Smith NEA Jazz Master Award Recipient Hammond Organist telling last jokes just one month before he passed away on February 8 2005. Filmed by Jon Hammond on NEA Panel including Kenny Burrell, Slide Hampton, Paquito D’Rivera, A.B. Spellman.
Jimmy tells the story about his adventures driving his Hammond B3 Organ and musicians in a Hearse and story of (like the commercial) “Got go gotta’ go gotta go right now…almost made it” while on the gig on bandstand. Hilarious must see.. Jon Hammond — with George Wein

Melvin Sparks March 22, 1946 – March 15, 2011 – Jon Hammond
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Melvin_Sparks
Melvin Sparks (March 22, 1946 – March 15, 2011)[1] was an American soul jazz, hard bop and jazz blues guitarist. He recorded a number of albums for Prestige Records, later recording for Savant Records. He appeared on several recordings with musicians including Lou Donaldson, Sonny Stitt, Leon Spencer and Johnny Hammond Smith.[1]
Sparks was born in Houston, Texas, United States, and raised in a musical family. He received his first guitar at age 11. Sparks began working in the rhythm and blues genre as a high school student, first with Hank Ballard and the Midnighters, and then with the Upsetters, a touring band formed by Little Richard, which also backed Jackie Wilson, Curtis Mayfield and Marvin Gaye.[2]
Sparks moved to New York City and worked as a session musician for Blue Note and Prestige Records. As part of the burgeoning soul-jazz scene of the late 1960s and early 1970s, Sparks often backed organists like Jack McDuff, Dr. Lonnie Smith and Charles Earland. Sparks released his debut album, Sparks!, for Prestige in 1970.[2]
He was seen on Northeastern television commercials as the voice of Price Chopper’s House of BBQ advertising campaign.[3]
Sparks died on March 15, 2011, at age 64, at his home in Mount Vernon, New York. He had diabetes and high blood pressure. — with Melvin Sparks

Frankfurt Germany — Jon Hammond setup in Jazzkeller Frankfurt – Hammond Sk1 organ through TecAmp Puma 900 – 2 x 12″ Neodymium drivers – Youtube http://youtu.be/AJT522j_nPQ
Get Back In The Groove Jon Hammond Band in Jazzkeller Frankfurt
2012 Annual Musikmesse Warm Up Party hosted by Jon Hammond Band in Jazzkeller Frankfurt “Get Back In The Groove” / Tribute to 9/11 by Jon Hammond
with Tony Lakatos tenor sax, Joe Berger guitar, Giovanni Gulino drums,
Jon Hammond at the Hammond Sk1 organ,
special guest Lee Oskar harmonica.
This performance marks 26 years consecutive attending Musikmesse Frankfurt and
it was also on the birthday of Jon Hammond March 20th, 2012 with a big chocolate on chocolate cake baked by Saray Pastanesi Baeckerei & Konditorei bakery — at Jazzkeller

Ulm Germany — Excellent amplifier for Lead/Rhythm and or Bass/Organ – from Professor Klaus Maier class room at Ulrich-von-Ensingen-Realschule Ulm – Jon Hammond
http://www.uve.schule.ulm.de/
ULRICH-VON-ENSINGEN-REALSCHULE
Frauenstraße 101
89073 Ulm

Emeryville California — Grand Opening Treff Cafe is already closed, hopefully another reopening in future, the coffee was good while it lasted! Jon Hammond — with Nader Shabahangi and Nora Davis at Agesong At Bayside Park

Setzingen – Ulm — Godfather and God Son of Soul – James Brown and Michael Falkenstein – Hammond Germany Organ Studio happy 30th anniversary! Jon Hammond
Youtube http://youtu.be/VjiDnJM0bd0
Congratulations 30th year Hammond Organ Germany Studio pictorial James Brown Visiting his God Son Michael Falkenstein – incredible must see and hear:
James Brown the Godfather of Soul and his God Son Michael F…See More — with James Brown and Michael Falkenstein

Anaheim California — Bonnie Raitt and Jon Hammond
*Thanks for coming over to check out my band at Shoreline Amphitheatre Bonnie! – Jon
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bonnie_Raitt

Bonnie Lynn Raitt (born November 8, 1949) is a renowned American blues singer-songwriter and slide guitar player. During the 1970s, Raitt released a series of acclaimed roots-influenced albums which incorporated elements of blues, rock, folk and country, but she is perhaps best known for her more commercially accessible recordings in the 1990s including “Nick of Time”, “Something to Talk About”, “Love Sneakin’ Up on You”, and the slow ballad “I Can’t Make You Love Me”. Raitt has received nine Grammy Awards in her career and is a lifelong political activist.
Raitt, the daughter of Broadway musical star John Raitt and his first wife, pianist Marjorie Haydock, began playing guitar at an early age, something few of her high school female friends did. Later she would become famous for her bottleneck-style guitar playing. “I had played a little at school and at camp”, she later recalled in a July 2002 interview. The camp Raitt refers to is Camp Regis-Applejack, located on Upper St. Regis Lake in New York.
[edit]Pre-recording career
After graduating from Oakwood Friends School in Poughkeepsie, New York, in 1967 Raitt entered Harvard’s Radcliffe College as a freshman, majoring in Social Relations and African Studies.[1] “My plan was to travel to Tanzania, where President Julius Nyerere was creating a government based on democracy and socialism”, Raitt recalled. “I wanted to help undo the damage that Western colonialism had done to native cultures around the world. Cambridge, Massachusetts was a hotbed of this kind of thinking, and I was thrilled.”
One day, Raitt was told by a friend that blues promoter Dick Waterman was giving an interview at WHRB, Harvard’s college radio station. An important figure in the blues revival of the 1960s, Waterman was also a Cambridge resident. Raitt went to see Waterman, and the two soon became friends, “much to the chagrin of my parents, who didn’t expect their freshman daughter to be running around with 65-year-old bluesmen,” recalled Raitt. “I was amazed by his passion for the music and the integrity with which he managed the musicians.”
During Raitt’s sophomore year, Waterman relocated to Philadelphia, and a number of local musicians he counted among his friends went with him. Raitt had become a strong part of that community, recalling that “… these people had become my friends, my mentors, and though I had every intention of graduating, I decided to take the semester off and move to Philadelphia …. It was an opportunity that young white girls just don’t get, and as it turns out, an opportunity that changed everything.”
By now, Raitt was also playing folk and rhythm and blues clubs in the Boston area, performing alongside established blues legends such as Howlin’ Wolf, Sippie Wallace, and Mississippi Fred McDowell, all of whom she met through Waterman.
[edit]Signing with Warner Bros.
In the fall of 1970, while opening for McDowell at the Gaslight Cafe in New York, she was seen by a reporter from Newsweek Magazine, who began to spread word of her performance. Scouts from major record companies were soon attending her shows to watch her play. She eventually accepted an offer with Warner Bros. who soon released her debut album, Bonnie Raitt, in 1971. The album was warmly received by the music press, many of whom praised her skills as an interpreter and as a bottleneck guitarist; at the time, very few women in popular music had strong reputations as guitarists.
While admired by those who saw her perform, and respected by her peers, Raitt gained little public acclaim for her work. Her critical stature continued to grow but record sales remained modest. Her second album, Give It Up, was released in 1972 to universal acclaim; though many critics still regard it as her best work, it did not change her commercial fortunes. 1973’s Takin’ My Time was also met with critical acclaim, but these notices were not matched by the sales.
Raitt was beginning to receive greater press coverage, including a 1975 cover story for Rolling Stone Magazine, but with 1974’s Streetlights, reviews for her work were becoming increasingly mixed. By now, Raitt was already experimenting with different producers and different styles, and she began to adopt a more mainstream sound that continued through 1975’s Home Plate.
In 1976, Raitt made an appearance on Warren Zevon’s eponymous album with his friend Jackson Browne and Fleetwood Mac’s Lindsey Buckingham and Stevie Nicks.
1977’s Sweet Forgiveness album gave Raitt her first commercial breakthrough when it yielded a hit single in her cover of “Runaway.” Recast as a heavy Rhythm and Blues recording based on a rhythmic groove inspired by Al Green, Raitt’s version of “Runaway” was disparaged by many critics. However, the song’s commercial success prompted a bidding war for Raitt between Warner Bros. and Columbia Records. “There was this big Columbia – Warner war going on at the time”, recalled Raitt in a 1990 interview. “James Taylor had just left Warner Bros. and made a big album for Columbia…And then, Warner signed Paul Simon away from Columbia, and they didn’t want me to have a hit record for Columbia — no matter what! So, I renegotiated my contract, and they basically matched Columbia’s offer. Frankly the deal was a really big deal.”
Warner Brothers held higher expectations for Raitt’s next album, 1979’s The Glow, but it was released to poor reviews as well as modest sales. Raitt would have one commercial success in 1979 when she helped organize the five MUSE (Musicians United for Safe Energy) concerts at Madison Square Garden in New York City. The shows spawned the a three-record gold album as well as a Warner Brothers feature film, No Nukes. The shows featured co-founders Jackson Browne, Graham Nash, John Hall, and Raitt as well as Bruce Springsteen, Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, The Doobie Brothers, Carly Simon, James Taylor, Gil Scott-Heron, and numerous others.
For her next record, 1982’s Green Light, Raitt made a conscious attempt to revisit the sound of her earlier records. However, to her surprise, many of her peers and the media compared her new sound to the burgeoning New Wave movement. The album received her strongest reviews in years, but her sales did not improve and this would have a severe impact on her relationship with Warner Brothers.
[edit]Drop from Warner Brothers
In 1983, as Raitt was finishing work on her follow-up album, entitled Tongue & Groove, Warner Brothers “cleaned house”, dropping a number of major artists such as Van Morrison and Arlo Guthrie from their roster. The day after mastering was completed on Tongue & Groove, the record label dropped Raitt also. The album was shelved indefinitely, and Raitt was left without a record label. By then, Raitt was also struggling with alcohol and drug abuse problems.[2]
Despite her personal and professional problems, Raitt continued to tour and participate in political activism. In 1985, she sang and appeared in the video of “Sun City”, the anti-apartheid record written and produced by guitarist Steven Van Zandt. Along with her participation in Farm Aid and Amnesty International concerts, Raitt traveled to Moscow in 1987 to participate in the first joint Soviet/American Peace Concert, later shown on the Showtime television network. Also in 1987, Raitt organized a benefit in Los Angeles for Countdown ’87 to Stop Contra Aid. The benefit featured herself along with musicians Don Henley, Herbie Hancock, Holly Near and others.
[edit]Tongue and Groove’s name change and release

Bonnie Raitt at 1990 Grammy Awards
Two years after dropping her from their label, Warner Brothers notified Raitt of their plans to release Tongue & Groove. “I said it wasn’t really fair,” recalled Raitt. “I think at this point they felt kind of bad. I mean, I was out there touring on my savings to keep my name up, and my ability to draw was less and less. So they agreed to let me go in and recut half of it, and that’s when it came out as Nine Lives.” A critical and commercial disappointment, 1986’s Nine Lives would be Raitt’s last new recording for Warner Brothers.
In late 1987, Raitt joined singers k.d. lang and Jennifer Warnes as female background vocals for Roy Orbison’s television special, Roy Orbison and Friends, A Black and White Night. Following this highly acclaimed broadcast, Raitt began working on new material. By then, Raitt was clean and sober, having resolved her substance abuse problem. She later credited Stevie Ray Vaughan for his help in a Minnesota State Fair concert[3] the night after Vaughan’s 1990 death. During this time, Raitt considered signing with Prince’s own label, Paisley Park, but negotiations ultimately fell through. Instead she began recording a bluesy mix of pop and rock under the production guidance of Don Was at Capitol Records.
Raitt had met Was through Hal Wilner, who was putting together Stay Awake, a tribute album to Disney music for A&M. Was and Wilner both wanted Raitt to sing lead on an adult-contemporary arrangement created by Was for “Baby Mine”, the lullaby from Dumbo. Raitt was very pleased with the sessions, and she asked Was to produce her next album.
[edit]Peak commercial success
After nearly 20 years, Bonnie Raitt achieved belated commercial success with her tenth album, Nick of Time. Released in the spring of 1989, Nick of Time went to the top of the U.S. charts following Raitt’s Grammy sweep in early 1990. This album has been voted number 230 in the Rolling Stone magazine list of 500 Greatest Albums Of All Time. Raitt herself pointed out that her 10th try was “my first sober album.”[4]
At the same time, Raitt received a fourth Grammy Award for her duet “In the Mood” with John Lee Hooker on his album The Healer. Nick of Time was also the first of many of her recordings to feature her longtime rhythm section of Ricky Fataar and James “Hutch” Hutchinson (Although previously Fataar had played on her Green Light album and Hutchinson had worked on Nine Lives). Nick of Time has sold over six million copies in the US alone.
Raitt followed up this success with three more Grammy Awards for her 1991 album, Luck of the Draw which has currently sold nearly 8 million copies in the United States. Three years later, in 1994, she added two more Grammys with her album Longing In Their Hearts, her second no. 1 album. Both of these albums were multi-platinum successes. Raitt’s collaboration with Was would amicably come to an end with 1995’s live release, Road Tested. Released to solid reviews, it sold well enough to be certified gold.
For her next studio album, Raitt hired Mitchell Froom and Tchad Blake as her producers. “I loved working with Don Was but I wanted to give myself and my fans a stretch and do something different,” Raitt said. Her work with Froom and Blake was released on Fundamental in 1998.
[edit]Current era

Raitt performing onstage in 2004
In March 2000, Raitt was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland, Ohio.
Silver Lining was released in 2002 while Souls Alike was released in September 2005.
Australian Country Music Artist Graeme Connors has said, “Bonnie Raitt does something with a lyric no one else can do; she bends it and twists it right into your heart.” (ABC Radio NSW Australia interview with Interviewer Chris Coleman on 18 January 2007)[5]
In 2007, Raitt accepted an invitation to contribute to Goin’ Home: A Tribute to Fats Domino. With Jon Cleary, she sang a medley of “I’m in Love Again” and “All by Myself” of Fats Domino.
Raitt appeared on the June 7, 2008 broadcast of Garrison Keillor’s radio program “A Prairie Home Companion”. She performed two blues songs with Kevin “Keb’ Mo'” Moore: “No Getting Over You” and “There Ain’t Nothin’ in Ramblin’.” Raitt also sang Dimming of the Day with Richard Thompson. This show, along with another on which Raitt with her band in October 2006, is archived on the Prairie Home Companion web site.
In February 2012, Raitt performed a duet with Alicia Keys at the 54th Grammy Awards in 2012 honoring Etta James.
In April 2012, Raitt released her first studio album since Souls Alike in 2005. Entitled Slipstream, the new album was released in North America on April 10. Slipstream has been praised as “her best album in years and one of the best of her 40-year career” by American Songwriter Magazine.[6]
In September 2012, she will be featured in a campaign called “30 Songs / 30 Days” to support Half the Sky: Turning Oppression into Opportunity for Women Worldwide, a multi-platform media project inspired by Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn’s book. [7]
Bonnie Rait is listed at number 50 in the Rolling Stone magazine list of 100 Greatest Singers.[8] She is also listed at number 89 in the Rolling Stone list of 100 Greatest Guitarists. [9]
[edit]Political activism

Raitt’s political involvement goes back to the early seventies. Her 1972 album “Give it up” had a dedication “to the people of North Vietnam …” printed on the back.
Raitt’s web site urges fans to learn more about preserving the environment. She was a founding member of Musicians United for Safe Energy in 1979 and a catalyst for the larger anti-nuclear movement, becoming involved with groups like the Abalone Alliance and Alliance for Survival.
In 1994 at the urging of writer Dick Waterman, Raitt funded the replacement of a headstone for one of her mentors, blues guitarist Fred McDowell through the Mt. Zion Memorial Fund. Raitt later financed memorial headstones in Mississippi for musicians Memphis Minnie, Sam Chatmon, and Tommy Johnson again with the Mt. Zion Memorial Fund.
At the Stockholm Jazz Festival in July 2004, Raitt dedicated a classic to sitting (and later re-elected) U.S. President George W. Bush. She was quoted as saying, “We’re gonna sing this for George Bush because he’s out of here, people!” before she launched into the opening licks of “Your Good Thing (Is About to End)”, a cover that was featured on her 1979 album The Glow. In 2002, Raitt signed on as an official supporter of Little Kids Rock, a nonprofit organization that provides free musical instruments and free lessons to children in public schools throughout the U.S.A. She has visited children in the program and sits on the organization’s board of directors as an honorary member.
In 2008, Raitt donated a song to the Aid Still Required’s CD to assist with relief efforts in Southeast Asia from the 2004 Tsunami.
Raitt worked with Reverb, a non-profit environmental organization, for her 2005 Fall/Winter and 2006 Spring/Summer/Fall tours.[10]
Raitt is part of the No Nukes group which is against the expansion of nuclear power. In 2007, No Nukes recorded a music video of a new version of the Buffalo Springfield song “For What It’s Worth”.[11][12][13]
During the 2008 Democratic primary campaign Raitt, along with Jackson Browne and bassist James “Hutch” Hutchinson, performed at campaign appearances for candidate John Edwards.
[edit]Personal life

Raitt and actor Michael O’Keefe were married on April 27, 1991. They announced their divorce on November 9, 1999.

New York NY — Junior Mance at the piano – on the gig at Local 802 Musicians Union – this piano finally bit the dust unfortunately – the old Steinway
Junior Mance and Jon Hammond interview in 5 parts:
http://youtu.be/crsVk2Nt_bA
http://youtu.be/Tt5aI2JmoAw
http://youtu.be/w2sqVBSIP3M
http://youtu.be/8_RtxDg1z_0 — with Junior Mance at Associated Musicians of Greater New York, Local 802 AFM

Junior Mance, New School, Pocket Funk, Jon Hammond, Musikmesse, Bonnie Raitt, Joe Morello, NAMM, Blues, Jazz, Sk1 organ

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